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your pregnancy place - Staying healthy during pregnancy

Weight Gain During Pregnancy

Weight Gain During Pregnancy

The recommended weight gain during pregnancy is generally between 25 and 35 pounds for women who were at a healthy weight before pregnancy. The recommended weight gain will depend on your weight before pregnancy and other factors that your health care provider will discuss with you. Wherever your starting weight stands, you should not go on a diet, nor should you eat for two or more during your pregnancy. Too little and too much weight gain can lead to problems for both you and the baby in the months ahead. Eating the right foods is much more important than just eating a lot.

A second-trimester highlight is when you transition from feeling fat to looking pregnant -- some time during the fourth or fifth month -- and the outside world takes note. Total strangers might wish you well or inquire as to which month you're in. And if you take public transportation, something out of the ordinary may happen -- someone might actually offer you a seat!

Depending on how much weight you're carrying and how flexible you are, you might be feeling like you just can't lean down anymore. Some moms highly recommend wearing strapless shoes -- mules, clogs or thongs -- so you can slip your feet in and out without having to bend over your belly all the time. Whatever shoes you wear, make sure they have good support.

Keep in mind that most of the weight you gain during pregnancy is baby-related (not fat) between the baby, the placenta, amniotic fluid, and the fluid that accumulates in your body tissues.

About half of that weight will melt away in the first 6 weeks after your baby is born. You'll lose the rest by about 6 months after you deliver.




Review Date: 12/9/2012
Reviewed By: Irina Burd, MD, PhD, Maternal Fetal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. A.D.A.M. Editorial Update: 06/11/2014
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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