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Peritoneal fluid analysis

Definition

How the Test is Performed

The sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe.

Your health care provider will clean and numb a small area of your belly area (abdomen). A needle is inserted through the skin of your abdomen into the peritoneal space, and a fluid sample is pulled out. The fluid is collected into a tube (syringe) attached to the end of the needle.

The fluid is sent to a lab where it is examined. Tests will be done on the fluid to measure:

  • Albumin
  • Protein
  • Red and white blood cell counts

Tests will also check for bacteria and other types of infection.

The following tests may also be done:

  • Alkaline phosphatase
  • Amylase
  • Cytology (appearance of cells)
  • Glucose
  • LDH

How to Prepare for the Test

Let your health care provider know if you:

  • Are taking any medications (including herbal remedies)
  • Have any allergies to medications or numbing medicine
  • Have any bleeding problems
  • Might be pregnant

How the Test will Feel

If a large amount of fluid is taken out, you may feel dizzy or light-headed. Tell the health care provider if you feel dizzy.

Why the Test is Performed

The test is done to:

  • Detect peritonitis
  • Find the cause of fluid in the abdomen
  • Remove large amounts of fluid from the peritoneal space in people who have liver disease
  • See whether an injury to the abdomen has caused internal bleeding

What Abnormal Results Mean


  • Bile-stained fluid may mean you have a gallbladder or liver problem.
  • Bloody fluid may be a sign of tumor or injury.
  • High white blood cell counts may be a sign of peritonitis.
  • Milk-colored peritoneal fluid may be a sign of carcinoma, cirrhosis of the liver, lymphoma, tuberculosis, or infection.

Other abnormal test results may be due to a problem in the intestines or organs of the abdomen. Large differences between the amount of albumin in the peritoneal fluid and in your blood may point to heart, liver, or kidney failure. Small differences may be a sign of cancer or infection.

Risks


  • Damage to the bowel, bladder, or a blood vessel in the abdomen from a needle puncture
  • Infection
  • Low blood pressure
  • Shock

References

 


Review Date: 1/22/2013
Reviewed By: George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, California. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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