Advocate BroMenn Medical Center
a patient or visitor a physician or healthcare professional an employer
PrintEmail

 

Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+) font size

medical services home
search by doctor name 
Doctor Name Contains (Smart Search)
OR
search by specialty

search by city/zip code
Find a doctor near your location by entering a city name OR ZIP code.
Near:


Within miles:
0 1 5 10 15 30 30+

search by insurance
Insurance Name Contains (Smart Search)
 (what's this)
 
spacer

related health information

Search Health Information   
 
Images
Read More
In-Depth Reports
More Features
 

Angiodysplasia of the colon

Definition

Alternative Names

Vascular ectasia of the colon; Colonic arteriovenous malformation

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Tests that may be done to diagnose this condition include:

  • Angiography (only useful if there is active bleeding into the colon)
  • Complete blood count (CBC) to check for anemia
  • Colonoscopy
  • Stool test for occult (hidden) blood (a positive test result suggests bleeding from the colon)

Treatment

It is important to determine what is causing the bleeding in the colon and how fast blood is being lost. You may need to be admitted to a hospital. Fluids may be given through a vein, and blood products may be required.

Other treatment may be needed once the source of bleeding is found. Most patients stop bleeding on their own without any treatment.

If treatment is needed, it may involve:

  • Angiography to help block the blood vessel that is bleeding or to deliver medicine to help cause the blood vessels to tighten to stop the bleeding
  • Burning (cauterizing) the site of the bleed with heat or a laser using a colonoscope

Outlook (Prognosis)

Patients who have bleeding related to this condition despite having had colonoscopy, angiography, or surgery are likely to have more bleeding in the future.

The outlook remains good if the bleeding is controlled.

Possible Complications

  • Anemia
  • Death from excessive blood loss
  • Side effects from treatment
  • Severe loss of blood from the GI tract

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health provider if rectal bleeding occurs.

Prevention

There is no known prevention.

References


Review Date: 1/22/2013
Reviewed By: George F. Longstreth, MD, Department of Gastroenterology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, San Diego, California. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 

quick links patient information health care professional information employer information connect with Advocate

About Advocate | Contact Us | Jobs | SiteMap | Terms of Use | Notice of privacy practices ®Advocate Health Care, Downers Grove, Illinois, USA | 1.800.3.ADVOCATE | TDD 312.528.5030